Buried in time – a Romano-British carved stone head from Boldre

Hampshire Archaeology

Many carved stone heads have been found in Britain, mostly in the north and west of the country.  A great number of them originate from the religious practices of the native (Iron Age) people living in Britain both before and during the Roman occupation of the first four centuries AD.  They are essentially cult objects.  Hampshire has little natural stone (other than flint and chalk) but a fine example of a head comes from the parish of Boldre in the New Forest.  It is made of Bembridge limestone, which is found nearby on the Isle of Wight and also on the Isle of Purbeck, Dorset.

Full frontal - menacing eyebrows and bulbous eyes, but a damaged nose and chin Full frontal – menacing eyebrows and bulbous eyes, but a damaged nose and chin

The head was discovered in a disused gravel pit, then being used as a rubbish dump, by a boy who was staying in a cottage in Portmore, Boldre, and he took…

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About Roger Nield MBE

Safety Director for the SMPL Organisation and supporting our Vulnerable Veterans Programme.
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One Response to Buried in time – a Romano-British carved stone head from Boldre

  1. davidwhallen says:

    Many thanks ! That’s a great site.

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